Nice Orchid Types photos

Check out these orchid types images:

Image from page 362 of “Lessons with plants. Suggestions for seeing and interpreting some of the common forms of vegetation” (1907)
orchid types
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924000606461
Title: Lessons with plants. Suggestions for seeing and interpreting some of the common forms of vegetation
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Bailey, L. H. (Liberty Hyde), 1858-1954
Subjects: Botany
Publisher: New York : Macmillan, 1914
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
-pleted. GERMINATION OF BEANS 327 398a. Monoootyledonous plants are less numerous, as to kinds,than the dicotyledons. Here belong all the palms, lilies, grassesand cereal grains, rushes, sedges, orchids, cannas, bananas, arumsand duokmeats. Most bulbous plants are monocotyledons. Someof these plants are illustrated in Pigs. 39, 40, 41, 58, 74, 101, 102,119, 138, 142, 148, 165, 166, 167, 168, 183, 184, 188, 189, 196, 199,212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225,254, 281. LXIII. GERMINATION OP BEANS 399. Plant a few common beans and watch thegermination. The plantlets back out of the soil much as the squashLi^fn^^;?. does, and the coty-ledons, a, Fig. 348,are elevated into theair. These cotyledonsremain practically thesame size as they werein the seed, however,and do not becomeconspicously greenand leaf-like. 400. At the sametime, plant seeds ofthe Scarlet Runner orWhite Dutch Runner bean. The first foliar partsto appear are true leaves (Fig. 349), and if the

Text Appearing After Image:
?Fig. 348. Germination ofcommon bean. Fig. 349. Germination ofScarlet Runner bean. 328 LESSONS MlTE PLANTS plant be dug up, the cotyledons will be found tohave remained under the ground. Observe care-fully at what point the roots start out from theseed. 401. There are, then, two types of germinationas respects the position of the cotyledons. In onetype, the seed-leaves rise above ground, or thegermination is epigeal (above the earth); in theother, they remain where the seed was planted, orthe germination is hypogeal (below the earth). 401a. The pupil should make a careful comparison of the dif-ferences in germination between the two types of beans mentionedabove. He may profitably add a, third factor to the experimentby including the garden pea. If he has access to oak trees, hemay watch the germination of the acorns as they lie upon theground in very early spring. Examine horse-chestnuts. 402. Measure the beans before they are planted,taking the length, width and thickness. If deli

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 76 of “Seed annual” (1909)
orchid types
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: seedannual1909livi
Title: Seed annual
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Livingston Seed Company Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Seeds Catalogs Seed industry and trade Ohio Columbus Catalogs Vegetables Ohio Columbus Catalogs Fruit Ohio Columbus Catalogs Flowers Ohio Columbus Catalogs Gardening Ohio Columbus Equipment and supplies catalogs
Publisher: Columbus, Ohio : A. W. Livingston’s Sons
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Giant Double Daisy (Bellie). T&gg5=sg<^^ Catalogue of The Livingston Seed Company, Columbus, Ohio ll^S^a^gftr 73

Text Appearing After Image:
Packet, 10c. wentieth Century, or Orchid-Flowered—A truly exquisitesingle Dahlia. Has created a sensation everywhere. Individualflowers are 5 to 8 inches across; innumerable colors, that have the richsheen of velvet. We cannot describe their elegance. Pkt., 10c. Lucifer—A superb almost black-leaved variety of dwarf habit;blooms mostly dark scarlet. Pkt., 10c. (/Xollerette, Choicest Mixed—A fine new type, having around itscenter disc a row of petals resembling a frilled collar, which are alwaysof a different color from the broad outer petals. There are many strik–combinations of colors. Pkt., 15c. Striped and Spotted Varieties—A very beautiful class, withfinely cut foliage and large single flowers of perfect form and manybrilliant colors. Pkt., 5c. // Single Tom Thumb, Superb Mixture—Contains many splendid?colors; fine for bedding; grows about one foot high. Pkt., 10c. Large-Flowering Single Mixed—Splendid assortment of single-flowering varieties. Pkt., 5c. Datlira (Trum

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 7 of “Horsford’s descriptive catalogue of hardy ornamentals herbaceous plants bulbs ferns shrubs and vines” (1894)
orchid types
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: horsfordsdescrip1894fhho
Title: Horsford’s descriptive catalogue of hardy ornamentals herbaceous plants bulbs ferns shrubs and vines
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: F.H. Horsford (Firm) Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Nursery stock Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs Orchids Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Catalogs Horticulture Vermont
Publisher: Charlotte, Vt. : F.H. Horsford
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
s, 5 cts. per pkt.A. coronaria alba. Much like the former type, except that the flowers are white. 15 cts. each, Si per dozen. A. coronaria bicolor. 15 cts. each, per dozen.A. FIos=Jovis. This plant attains a height of about2 feet. Flowers rose-colored, continuing for a longtime in bloom ; fine for cutting. 10 cts. each, 75cts. per dozen; seeds, 5 cts.ALETRIS farinosa (American Star-Grass, or Colic-Root). Forms tufts of lance-shaped leaves, clusteredat the base. Flowers in long spikes, white, bell-shaped Fine for hot, sandy situations. 15 cts.each, per dozen.ALLIUM acuminatum. Flowers deep rose, l/2 inchwide, in many fl >wered umbels. 6 to 10 inches high.10 cts. each. A. Bidwelliae. A fine little species for the rockery.A native of Nevada. Flowers bright rose, half aninch wide. 8 cts each.A. cernuum (Wild Onion). Flowers rose-colored. Asmall native species. 8 cts. each, 50 cts. per dozen.A. Cusickii. Oregon. 10 cts. each.Achillea, The Pearl. A. falcatum. Oregon. 10 cts. each.

Text Appearing After Image:
Hardy Ornamentals, Herbaceous Plants, Etc. 5horsfordsdescrip1894fhho

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Tags: , , ,

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.