Cool Caring For Orchids images

Some cool caring for orchids images:

Image from page 201 of “Birds and nature” (1900)
caring for orchids
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Identifier: birdsnature161904chic
Title: Birds and nature
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Birds Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : A.W. Mumford, Publisher
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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ir plantsexhibited is the Stag-horn Fern, Platyce- rium alcicome, which takes its name fromthe fact that its broad-formed leavesresemble horns—the name Platyceriummeaning in the Greek, broad horns. Thisplant is widespread in its distribution,being* found not only in Australia andAfrica, but occasionally in the southernstates of our own country, in Floridaand in Georgia. Epiphytes, aside from the ferns, usu-ally belong to the orchid family or to theBromeliaceae, a family of which pineap-ples are members. Among the orchids,epiphytes are beautiful and varied, espe-cially in far-away countries. In theUnited States they are represented by asingle wild species, Epidendrum conop-sciim, which clings to the trunks of mag-nolia trees in South Carolina. In ourfinest conservatories many of the rarespecies of orchid epiphytes are dis-played. The long, black moss Tillandsia,which hangs from the trees in Florida isepiphytic, and represents the Bromeli-aceae in this country. Mary Lee Van Hook. 17(5

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: i %&£? THE SKYLARK. {Alanda arvensis.) The Laverock sings a bonnie lay above the Scottish heather; It sprinkles down from far away like light and love together;He drops the golden notes to greet his brooding mate, his dearie; I only know one song more sweet,—the vespers of the veery. —Henry Van Dyke, The Veery. The Skylark is most truthfully thebird of the people in European countries.It is loved for its songs, its liveliness, itsharmless habits, and, because it inhabitsthose regions cultivated by man and livesin contentment with him. It cares notfor the bleak wastes, but let man turnthe furrow on the waste, and replace theheath, the moss, and the rush, by a morekindly vegetation, then the Lark is sureto come with its song of gratitude, toreveillie him to the field betimes, andcheer his labours the live-long day. The Skylark, too, is par excellence thebird of the poets and of many writers ofprose. Poets of every grade and merithave found inspiration in its song. Nobird has

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Image from page 85 of “Our new guide to rose culture : 1891” (1891)
caring for orchids
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Identifier: ournewguidetoros18ding
Title: Our new guide to rose culture : 1891
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Dingee & Conard Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Nursery stock Catalogs Roses Catalogs Nurseries (Horticulture) Bulbs (Plants) Seeds Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs
Publisher: West Grove, Pa. : The Dingee & Conard Co.
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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table; the -plants will thrive and flower as freely as Balsams,and will be a mass of bloom until the hard frosts of late Autumn. We have secured what we think is a greatly impiovedstrain of Salvia Splendens, the plants being more compact, branching right to the ground, and presenting a solid brilliantsheet of scarlet color. We offer it at the regular price of the old variety, and feel confident our customers will be thegainers in getting this improved strain. Per pkt., 15 cts.;. 2 pkts., 25 cts. BEAUTIFUL* NEU2 FHEflCH CA^NAS. Originated by a skillful and celebrated French grower, Mons. Crozy. They are entirely distinct. The foliage is lux-uriant and varied in color ; the plants grow 3 to 4 feet high. The profusion of bloom is something remarkable, shoot aftershoot coming up covered with richly colored orchid-like flowers. The colors range through crimson, rose, scarlet, yellow,salmon, etc., many flowers being beautifully striped and spotted. Per pkt., 25 cts. ; 3 pkts., 60 cts. (85).

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©TTR. LARGE FLOWERING NEWIMPERIAL GERMAN PANSIES are the best in existence for general planting. They are thelabor of many years careful selection and cultivation, andthe originator takes such pride in keeping his strain up toa high standard, that none of the crack strains recentlyoffered are equal to it forgeneralplanting. The plants areentirely hardy in all ordinary situations ; of fine size and com-pact growth ; blooming profusely all through the Summer. Themagnificent flowers are extra large, perfectly shaped, and em-brace the rarest and most beautiful vivid colors, superbly mottled,veined, marbled and spotted on backgrounds of every shade ; alsostriped and fancy flowers of unique beauty, and flowers with distincteyes and contrasting rims of striking novelty. Our Imperial GermanPansies will thrive splendidly with little care in almost any situation,while they richly reward the amattur who cultivates carefully andin the most approved manner. Price of the entire collection offeredb

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Image from page 123 of “H.W. Buckbee seed and plant guide : 1905” (1905)
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Identifier: hwbuckbeeseedpla1905hwbu
Title: H.W. Buckbee seed and plant guide : 1905
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: H.W. Buckbee (Firm) H.W. Buckbee (Firm) Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection
Subjects: Seeds Illinois Rockford Catalogs Vegetables Illinois Rockford Catalogs Flowers Illinois Rockford Catalogs Plants, Ornamental Illinois Rockford Catalogs Roses Illinois Rockford Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Illinois Rockford Catalogs Lawns Seeds Illinois Rockford Catalogs
Publisher: Rockford, Ill. : Buckbee
Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

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he branchesreaching a length of four or five feet,blooming nearly the whole year. Flow-ers and buds long and graceful, of abright, rosy scarlet. 10c. each. Beauty of Exmouth—(Double)— The lar-gest of all Fuchsias. Very distinct inits rich, dark coloring. The flowersare of enormous proportion, very dou-ble and broad, of great substance; wellreflexed, tube and sepals of beautifulcoral red, while the corolla is of thevery richest violet shade imaginable.A plant of this variety in full bloompresents a picture never to be forgot-ten. 15c. ecch. Pres. Carnot—(Double)—Enormous dou-ble corolla of a rich violet purple withvelvet reflex, with most beautiful car-mine sepals. One of the grandest ofall Fuchsias, and is very striking fromthe immense size and beautifullymarked flower. 10c. each. BEATTTT OF EXMOUTH. The Grandest and Most Lib-eral Fuchsia Bargain onEarth. DONT MISS IT. YOU GET YOUR MONEYS WORTH WHEN YOU BUY FROM BUCKBEE. 118 H. W. BUCKBEE, ROCKFORD ILLINOIS. IMPERIAL GLOXINIAS

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THE M©ST BEAUTIFUL FLOWER THHT BLOOMS. NEW IMPERIAL GLOXINIAS—GLOXINIAS are cer:ainly among the handsomest of our summer flowering plants, presenting asthey do, such a variation ot rich and e-cquisite coloring, equal 10 the orchid in novelty and beauty. The flowers are of hand-some shape and large size, and a great variety of co ors that are velvety in the depth and richness of shading. The flowers oftenmeasure a inches in length and 2 in width, and are upright and pendulous They succeed wen with ordinary care, and should hegrown in a moderately shady place, as the sun burns the foliage when wet, causing brown spots to appear. Plant bulbs in a mix-ture of light loam, manure and sand, equal parts, giving but little water until signs of life appear. You will have a succession ofbloom from June to September, and words cannot describe the rare beauty of these flowers to one who has never seen them.When done blooming, dry gradually, and keep in pots over winter in a warm place. Sps:ial

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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