Image from page 71 of “Orchids for everyone” (1910)

A few nice water orchids images I found:

Image from page 71 of “Orchids for everyone” (1910)
water orchids
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Identifier: cu31924003330374
Title: Orchids for everyone
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Curtis, Charles H
Subjects: Orchids
Publisher: London, J.M. Dent New York, E.P. Dutton
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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cies; A. Sanderianum, flowers white, numerous,and carried in drooping spikes; A. Scottianum, of dwarf habit,flowers pure white and long spurred. The last two species arefrom the Comoro Islands. The best of the Listrostachys group are A. caudatum, whichhas long spikes of greenish-yellow, white-lipped, long-spurredflowers; A. Chailluanum, a fine species with drooping spikes ofwhite flowers; A. pellucidum, a charming plant that bears longspikes of small white flowers that have a delicate, frosted appear-ance ; and A. pertusum, with white, yellow-spurred flowers.The two last named usually flower in the autumn or winter. By far the most important of the Mystacidium group is thenoble A. sesquipedale, a popular Orchid that has big ivory-whiteflowers with a spread of from eight to twelve inches, and a spurfrom twelve to eighteen inches long. From one to four flowersare borne on a spike, but often there are two spikes in flower atthe same time on a well-grown specimen. There are two varieties,

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AXGULOA RUCKERI. THE MOST USEFUL ORCHIDS 27 one flowering in the autumn and the other in the late winter.A. Leonis, also known as Aeranthus Leonis and AngracumHumblotit^ has white flowers and is a desirable dwarf species. ANGULOA Although they cannot successfully compete with the Odonto-glossums in grace and usefulness, the Anguloas, natives ofColombia, deserve a high position among cultivated Orchids.The large fleshy flowers are carried singly at the apex of a stoutflower-stem about a foot high. The pseudo-bulbs are large,often eight or nine inches long, and the broad, plicate, deep greenleafage rises to a height of eighteen inches or more. All are coolOrchids and will succeed with the Odontoglossums while in growthand bloom, but when they have finished their growth for theseason more light and a greatly reduced water supply are necessary,consequently it may be desirable to move the plants to a warmerhouse during the resting period. Anguloas need ample drainageand a potting mixture o

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Image from page 46 of “Our search for a wilderness; an account of two ornithological expeditions to Venezuela and to British Guiana” (1910)
water orchids
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Identifier: oursearchforwild00nile
Title: Our search for a wilderness; an account of two ornithological expeditions to Venezuela and to British Guiana
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Niles, Blair Beebe, William, 1877-1962
Subjects: Natural history Birds
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and company

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he air whichreminds us of Canadian dawns. It is still dusk, and thelines of mangroves on either side show only as black walls.For some minutes hardly a sound breaks the stillness exceptthe distant roars and the drip, drip of our paddles. Thru asudden splashing and breaking of branches shows that weare discovered by a pair or more of capybaras (11ydrochoeruscapybara), those enormous rodents which would pass asguinea pigs in Gullivers land of giants. Now an overhang-ing branch drenches us as we brush against it, and as it ispushed aside a whole armful of orchids comes away, the THE LAND OF A SINGLE TREE. 23 pure white blossoms (Epidendrum fragrans) filling the canowith their sweetness. Now the delicate foliage of a palm issilhouetted for a moment against the brightening eastern sky,and a mass of great convolvulous blossoms shines out fromthe shore. By this we know that we are not many milesfrom dry ground, and other growths are already beginning todispute the dominance of the mangroves.

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Fig. 10. White Orchids. Silence again, to be broken by one of the most remarkableand startling outbursts of sound which any living creaturein the world can utter. A series of unconnected sighs,shrieks, screams, and metallic trumpet-like notes suddenlybreaking forth apparently within thirty feet, is surely excuseenough for being startled. The hubbub ceases as abruptlyas it began; then again it breaks out, now seeming to comefrom all directions, even from overhead. The author of all 24 OUR SEARCH FOR A WILDERNESS. this is the Chachalaca7— a bird not larger than a commonfowl, but with a longer tail. It spends most of its time onthe ground or among the lower branches of the trees in theswamps. It was seldom that we caught sight of one, but weshall never forget the first time we heard their diabolicalchorus. The suns rays now light up the narrow path of water aheadof us, and a thousand creatures seem to awaken and givevoice at once. Two splendid Yellow and Blue Macaws61 flyhigh overhead,

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