Image from page 184 of “Orchids for everyone” (1910)

Some cool caring for orchids images:

Image from page 184 of “Orchids for everyone” (1910)
caring for orchids
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924003330374
Title: Orchids for everyone
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Curtis, Charles H
Subjects: Orchids
Publisher: London, J.M. Dent New York, E.P. Dutton
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
exceptionally favoured parts of the South-western counties, butit is never heard of as a real success under out-door treatment.Where a collection rather than a selection is the aim of the grower,then some trouble will be experienced in finding the right condi-tions for the various members of the family. But where thedesire is to have a set of the most beautiful kinds for flowering inthe spring and early summer, that desire may be fulfilled providedthere is a hot-house (a stove), and a heated vinery at disposal.With such structures, and with the same care and attention paidthem as are given to any other indoor crop, there is no goodreason why Dendrobiums cannot be successfully managed. Most of the Dendrobiums worthy of general cultivation aredeciduous, but there is a small and important group of evergreenspecies with showy flowers. As a general rule Dendrobiumsrequire a very high stove temperature and a moist atmosphere whengrowing freely, a season of rest in a cooler house and a drier

Text Appearing After Image:
J a N U THE MOST USEFUL ORCHIDS 85 atmosphere, and a comfortable intermediate temperature when inflower. Nearly all of the cultivated Dendrobiums flower in theearly spring, following a long resting season. New growth com-mences at or about the time of the flowering, usually during Marchand April, and it is the aim of cultivators to encourage the growthby every possible means, so that it may be completed by the end ofthe Summer or in early Autumn, while there is sufficient sunshineto make the new stem or pseudo-bulbs firm or ripe before theWinter, This ripening process is as essential as rapid and vigorousgrowth, because upon it depends largely the extent and duration ofthe flower crop the following Spring. Except when in flower,Dendrobiums require little shading, a thin blind to break up therays of the sun during the hottest part of a brilliant Summer daybeing sufficient. When growth has ceased for the year the plantsmust be gradually inured to cooler and drier conditions, as theirlea

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 113 of “Orchids for everyone” (1910)
caring for orchids
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: cu31924003330374
Title: Orchids for everyone
Year: 1910 (1910s)
Authors: Curtis, Charles H
Subjects: Orchids
Publisher: London, J.M. Dent New York, E.P. Dutton
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
owers, three or four inches across,are borne six or eight together in graceful drooping racemes inWinter or Spring ; if allowed to expand in a cool house they soondiscolour. In the type the lip is crested with yellow and has acentral blotch of the same colour. In the variety C. c. lemonianathe colour on the lip is pale lemon yellow, while in C. c. alba theblooms are entirely white. The flowers of this very beautiful andchaste Orchid are valuable for many kinds of floral decorations,especially for bouquets, but they must be handled with care becausebruised portions turn brown or black quickly. When the spikesare cut they must not be severed close to the pseudo-bulb, for it isfrom the sheathing base of the spike that the new growth comes,so that close cutting spoils the prospects for the following season. C. Dayana is a remarkable Bornean species that flowers inlate Spring or early Summer. It is a strong grower and is bestmanaged in a basket or pan suspended from the roof in the hottest

Text Appearing After Image:
< H<! OP ^OO e THE MOST USEFUL ORCHIDS 49 Stove or East Indian House. Considered individually the bloomsare not large or very attractive, the colour being pale ochreousyellow, with chocolate brown lines and blotch on the lighter, oftenwhitish, lip. But these flowers are borne on graceful pendulousracemes from two to three feet long, and one of these racemes willconsist of two dozen blooms. A good specimen carrying a numberof these floral necklaces makes a charming picture. C. Massangeana comes from Assam and has much the samehabit as C. Dayana^ but is not quite such a strong grower. More-over, it will succeed in less heat than is necessary for the latterspecies. The Intermediate House will suit it. The pendulousracemes carry twenty or more flowers, which are light yellow, witha brown lip that is veined and crested with bright yellow and edgedwith white. C. OCELLATA, a pretty, compact species about nine inches high,is best grown in a shallow pan, with the Odontoglossum

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.